The if Statement c#

The if statement is a far more versatile and useful way to make decisions. Unlike ?: statements, if statements don ’ t have a result (so you can ’ t use them in assignments); instead, you use the statement to conditionally execute other statements. The simplest use of an if statement is as follows, where < test > is evaluated (it must evaluate to a Boolean value for the code to compile) and the line of code that follows the statement is executed if
 
< test > evaluates to true :
if ( < test > )
< code executed if < test > is true > ;

 
After this code is executed, or if it isn ’ t executed due to < test > evaluating to false , program execution resumes at the next line of code.
You can also specify additional code using the else statement in combination with an if statement. This statement is executed if < test > evaluates to false :
 
if ( < test > )
< code executed if < test > is true > ;
else
< code executed if < test > is false > ;

Example

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string comparison;
            Console.WriteLine("Enter a number:");
            double var1 = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.WriteLine("Enter another number:");
            double var2 = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());
            if (var1 < var2)
                comparison = "less than";
            else
            {
                if (var1 == var2)
                    comparison = "equal to";
                else
                    comparison = "greater than";
            }
            Console.WriteLine("The first number is {0} the second number.",
            comparison);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}